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Abstracts on Organisations - 'W'



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Compiled: Martin Melaugh ... Additional Material: Brendan Lynn and Fionnuala McKenna
Material is added to this site on a regular basis - information on this page may change

initial letter of the name of the organisation
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

WAVE
WAVE is a grass roots cross community organisation established in 1991 to provide support and care to people bereaved of a spouse as a result of violence in Northern Ireland. Hence the original name 'Widows Against Violence Empower'. It was expanded later to incorporate the needs of young people/children and anyone traumatised through the "Troubles". Today the overall aim of WAVE is to offer care and support to anyone bereaved or traumatised through the violence, irrespective of religious, cultural or political belief.
(See: Details on vicitims organisations.)


West Belfast Loyalist Coalition (WBLC)
(xx)


West Ulster Unionist Council (WUUC)
The WUUC was a pressure group within the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) based mainly in the west of Northern Ireland. Its members were mainly drawn from the UUP and included Harry West a former Stormont minister. The WUUC was active between 1969 and 1971. Its aims were stated as defending 'traditional Unionism' and it advocated tougher security measures.


Widows Against Violence Empowered (WAVE)
(See: WAVE)


Women Together For Peace (WTFP)
synonyms: Women Together
Women Together (For Peace) was launched in November 1970 when Catholic and Protestant women came together to campaign for the end to violence. Monica Patterson was the chairwoman of the movement from 1970 to 1973. Women Together For Peace was officially launched in December 1997 and organised peace rallies. The organisation also provides support to those families bereaved by sectarian killings.


Women's Action
A group that formed to provide support to the Ulster Defence Association (UDA). The group was involved in the Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) strike in May 1974.


Women's Coalition
synonyms: Northern Ireland Women's Coalition (NIWC)
(See: Northern Ireland Women's Coalition; NIWC.)


Women's Peace Movement
synonyms: Peace People
(See: Peace People, PP.)


Woodvale Defence Association (WDA)
(xx)


Workers' Committee for the Defence of the Constitution (WCDC)
A Protestant workers' organisation set up in late 1969. Was established to oppose the 'Republican' Civil Rights movement. Was largely ineffective, however some of its members went on to establish the Loyalist Association of Workers (LAW).


Workers Party (WP)
The Workers' Party (WP) grew out of Official Sinn Féin which was considered the political wing of the Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA). The Workers' Party is organised in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland with the Northern section being semi-autonomous. The organisation is a Socialist / Marxist Republican party which arose from the "Official" majority faction which remained loyal to the then leadership of Sinn Féin in the 1969-70 split. At that time the Northern section of Sinn Féin operated under the name Republican Clubs and following the split became know as Official Republican Clubs (then Republican Clubs the Workers' Party; then Sinn Féin the Workers' Party; finally in 1982 the Workers' Party). The movement's attempts to develop radical anti-sectarian socialist politics in the North were hampered by the climate of violence in the 1970s and 1980s. The party also had to content with allegations of gangsterism associated with the Official IRA and by factionalism within the political wing. The party suffered a serious split in 1992 when six of its seven Teachta Dáil (TDs) left the party to set up a new organisation Democratic Left (initially called New Agenda). The WP, which campaigns for peace, full employment and class politics, has been represented by six councillors on local councils in Northern Ireland, with one remaining councillor in 1996. However the party rarely secured more than 2.5 per cent of the parliamentary poll, and only 0.6 per cent in 1992; in the 1996 Forum elections its share fell to 0.5 per cent. The party supported the Good Friday Agreement. The Workers' Party is led nationally by Tom French (National President); its Northern Regional Secretary is Tommy Owens.
[Website]


World Socialist Party - Ireland (WSPI)
A sister party of the Socialist Party of Great Britain, with the same programme.


Notes:
(xx)     Indicates that an entry is being prepared.
(?)     Information is a best estimate while awaiting an update.
(??)     Information is doubtful and is awaiting an update.
[Main Entry]     Indicates that a longer separate entry is planned in the future.

For related and background information see also:

  • The list of acronyms associated with 'the Troubles'.
  • The glossary of terms related to the conflict.
  • The biographies of people who were prominent during 'the Troubles'.
  • The chronology of the conflict.

Sources:
The information in the abstracts has been compiled from numerous primary and secondary sources. The best general sources for additional information are:


initial letter of the name of the organisation
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

CAIN contains information and source material on the conflict and politics in Northern Ireland.
CAIN is based within the University of Ulster.


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